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Moonlit portal

Following is painting I did last weekend on a whim, including the ink rendering and then with watercolour over it. It was a good exercise in not overdoing the ink when I know I’m going to paint. I wanted to create more depth with watercolour rather than have the pen and ink do all the…

Sketchbook entry: Natufian culture

After a brief hiatus I’m back to working in my sketchbooks and art journals. It has been a strangely mild summer for south-east Queensland. Until the last few days. There isn’t much to do but find a cool place to read, research and render. My goal for this year is to finish a couple of…

A Moreton Bay Fig in pen and ink

Moreton Bay Figs, sometimes Australian Banyan, (Ficus macrophylla) come in all shapes and sizes, as you can see from the photos. The first two photos were taken at Old Petrie Town, not far from my home. These individuals are said to be at least 300 years old. The third photo was taken at the Sydney…

Aotearoa: sketchbook page

This is going to sound more like a plug for New Zealand than an introduction to New Zealand archaeology, but here goes anyway . . . Between the ages of four to almost sixteen years old I lived in Christchurch, New Zealand. One of my favourite places to go was the Canterbury museum, a beautiful…

New Guinea: sketchbook entry

The island of New Guinea is a biologically and culturally diverse landscape. With over 1000 languages spoken across the island and 60,000 years worth of occupation, it is difficult to do justice to its superb history with just one page in a sketchbook. New Guinea remains largely inaccessible and unexplored by scientists. In this ever-changing…

Rapa Nui, the navel of the world

Rapa Nui, or Easter Island, a volcanic island in the South Pacific Ocean, is one of the most isolated inhabited places on the planet. The nearest inhabited island is over 2,000 kilometres (1242 miles) away. To its inhabitants it is Te Pito te Henua, “the navel of the world”. Estimates of when the island was…

The Archaeology of Malta

Human habitation in the archipelago of Malta goes back almost 7,000 years. The island has seen populations flourish and collapse repeatedly. It has been occupied, conquered and reconquered intermittently by Neolithic fisher/farmers and temple builders, Bronze Age people, Phoenicians, Romans, Byzantines, Muslims Normans, Sicilians, the French and British. Despite its erratic and often troubled past,…

A beautifully illustrated chronicle of now by illustrator Vic Lee. Wow!

I came across The Corona Diary, by illustrator Vic Lee while rummaging around the internet looking for illustrated diaries. The video below is a flip through of the limited edition printed book with commentary by Vic Lee himself, found on his own YouTube channel. I am as much attracted to the typography as to the…

Avebury and Stonehenge

Everyone knows about Stonehenge, but less well known is Avebury henge, the largest stone circle in the world. A larger prehistoric circular monument, called Marden Henge, located between Avebury and Stonehenge contains no stones, but has massive earthworks. It is much bigger than Stonehenge and Avebury, and is the largest henge in the British Isles.…

Red ochre revolution

It’s impossible to put an exact date on when art emerged in prehistory, especially since we don’t know if the first attempts were on rock, or some other, less enduring medium, such as wood, bone, in the dirt, or even on the skins of the makers. At best we know ancient people were using ochre…

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